The Wolverines Required Reading

The Wolverines Required Reading

Valentina Franco, Staff Writer

The purpose of summer reading books is to introduce new material that students will be exposed to in the upcoming school year. During the school year, required books are used to enhance the learning done in the classroom. This concept is familiar to all students, not only in The United States, but also in countries like Spain and England. In contrast, in Florida, students are first introduced to required reading books in third grade with the start of FCAT testing. What started off as simple reading practice with books like “The Magic Tree House” became into life lessons with books like “To Kill a Mocking Bird”.
One of the most famous required books in high school is “The Scarlett Letter”, which gathered enough fame to inspire the modern day movie “Easy A”. While other works such as “Pride and Prejudice” garnered everything but positive feedback from the Wellington High 10th grade student body. The unanimous sophomore groans were heard all throughout the English hallway when teachers went over each chapter. However, while surveying some Wellington High School students, “Unwind” and “The Count of Monte Cristo” were found to be some of the schools favorite required books.
When asked which book they preferred over all the other books they had read, Junior, Ryan Creech said “The Count of Monte Cristo was so good,”. Junior, Trey Fritz said “yea, I think I’m gonna go with Monte Cristo”. This was due to the fact that the long and intricate plot line, the vengeance theme, and the mystery of book was appealing to them. Others, such as Tommy Dash, preferred the futuristic thought provoking “Unwind” because of its unique theme. The fact that the book revolved around three teenagers running away, helped the connection between the reader and the characters. Differing in of tastes and preferences, David Aranguren, chose “Alas Babylon” as his all time favorite. The chaotic plot line and the setting in Florida, makes it very relatable. David said, “It kinda hit home since it took place in Florida,”
There’s one consistently disliked required book : “Pride and Prejudice”, students could hear the unanimous groans coming from the 10th grade English classes in the English hallways, but also– yours truly’s favorite required book ever. Another beloved favorite among the student body, “The Great Gatsby”, I personally could not get into.
At the end of the day, required reading and summer reading books are a great way to expand vocabulary, teach grammar and encrypt important themes in developing teenage minds. Whether or not doing the reading is enjoyable is subjective to each book and person.