Say What?

Say What?

Mya Mandell, Staff Writer

Sometimes people will stumble over their words if they’re talking too quickly or mix up their letters, but imagine dealing with this every time you spoke for the rest of your life. This common disruption of speech is called stuttering.
More than three million people worldwide struggle with this disorder. The average “stutter” is 10 percent less fluent then the normal speaker, it even affects the smoothness of speech, the rate at which someone talks, and the rhythm and the effort of speaking.
Boys are three times more likely to have this disorder than girls are. About 80 percent of the population who have this condition will naturally overcome it without speech therapy. For the 20 percent stuttering can be controlled through simple processes such as singing instead of speaking their words or practicing to read out loud.
“ I’ve been dealing with stuttering since I was about four and have had it ever since. It really messes with me, especially when I’m nervous or trying to talk to a cute girl I like. I normally just talk slower or sing my words to help me deal with it.” Ethan Passear, sophomore said.
There are three types of stuttering:
1. Core behaviors: stutters that can’t be controlled
2. Repetitions: repeating a sound or syllable more than once or twice
3. Prolongations: holding out a speech sound but the mouth has stopped moving
Stuttering can be caused by a numerous amount of things such as genetics, development abilities and environmental factors.
People make fun of those who stutter, it seems to be made fun of a lot because it appears as being a harmless disorder. This teasing can seriously hurt people’s feelings and damage their self-esteem making them think less of themselves.
“When my friends make a joke I can’t care less, but when somebody I don’t know brings up my stuttering or tries to crack a joke about it, I’ll probably end up punching them in the face. It offends me a lot because I can’t control it,” Ethan Passear, sophomore, said.
Stuttering can affect a person’s education, their jobs, and self-esteem. The untamable disorder can make a person feel lesser about them. Some people may not get hired depending on the type of work environment they are in and most jobs that involve people who stutter doesn’t include direct contact with other people. Although stuttering doesn’t make a person less eager or willing to work, it can determine his position in the work field and in life.