The Art of Staying Creative

The Art of Staying Creative

Madison Dalton

Madison Dalton, Opinion Editor

Many students and teachers at WHS find deep passion in the arts. However, individuals who desire to enter a career field in the arts are often faced with challenges.
Mr. Hoard is one such individual. Although he currently teaches graphic design at WHS, Mr. Hoard has his M.F.A. in art.
“I taught art for five year and there was no money. There was no budget as an [art] teacher and [there was] a lack of fine arts,” Hoard explained. “I had to be such a productionist, so I got out of it and went directly into industrial arts.”
Mr. Hoard explained that he sees a decrease in appreciation for the arts.
“I think public buildings have in the past been representative of the arts and in my lifetime, I see only square boxes.”
Jessie Dwyer, senior, has found her passion in the visual arts.
“I think art is becoming more appreciated because people are realizing that art is everywhere, “ Dwyer stated.
Dwyer explained that she believes society can start to value art more by valuing art teachers more.
“They’re making the world’s artists. I think it’s odd that college professors go through art school to be an art professor and then are under-paid,” Dwyer stated.
Natalia Tyson, senior, explained that because of the challenges artists face , her parents didn’t want her to peruse an art field.
“They think I’m really good at [art] and that I should peruse it, but not to the point that I have a field in it” Tyson said. “But I want to do art, so I just push myself to do art and my parents let me do what I want now.
MacKenzie Dulin, senior, hopes to attend a performing arts college.
“Theater is something that will last,” Dulin stated. “You can look at plays from hundreds of years ago and those really told exactly what was going on at that point in history. If [future generations] look at a play from today [they] will learn something from it. All the arts are very powerful and very emotional.”
Mr. Schaber, who teaches theater at WHS explains that it is possible to “make it” in theater if students are willing to fight to reach their goals.
“For every 100 people who peruse career in the arts, after one year 70 of those people have quit pursuing they’re career. After two years out of that 70 there are only 3 left and after three years out of those three only that one person is still left,” Schaber said. “That means that if you’re talented and willing to stick it out for more than three years, generally you stand a pretty good chance of making a living in the arts. The problem is people want stardom immediately and they’re not willing to struggle. You have to be willing to struggle.”
Mr. Schaber worked professionally as an actor for nine years. For the last five years he worked for Hanna Barbera touring shows where he met Yogi Bear and Scooby Doo and Fred Flintstone and the Smurfs personally. However, Schaber explained that he got tired worn down from traveling 46 weeks out of the year and wanted to settle down and have the opportunity to have close friend outside of work.
Schaber feels that though appreciation for the arts may still be flourishing, “people don’t support art. They download music for free instead of paying for it. They pirate videos instead of paying for it.”
Another important art area is music. Ms. Oser, band instructor at WHS explained that “there are too many students growing up not getting the opportunity to participate in the arts because those opportunities are being limited and taken away.”
Oser stated that WHS has been able to offer the arts pretty consistently, but due to budget cuts did have to cancel guitar and piano classes.
Oser explained that on a national scale, “the number one thing that needs to be done to allow students to participate in the arts is to emphasize the arts and lessen the emphasis on the high stakes testing that we have right now because that tends to take time away from the arts and other electives.”
Although Oser has seen an increase in the number of her own student swishing to peruse music professionally, she stated that, “it is very challenging to go into music especially if you’re going to go into music education because the course requirements are very stringent. One issue also for musicians is that they have to put in practice hours at the college level that are way above what they had to do in high school and a lot of them don’t do very well with having to do that along with all the other coursework they have to do.
Oser’s son is also perusing a career in music education and marches for the FSU marching band.
“[The FSU marching band] practices ten hours a week Monday through Friday,” Oser explained. “And then along with that he has all his regular coursework and then is expected to practice at least two hours a day so it’s tough for music majors when they get to that level. You really have to love it.”
Thankfully, it seems that there are enough individuals who do feel that strong love for the arts and are willing to struggle and face challenges in order to share their art form with the world.
Although art careers may be underpaid and present challenges, Chauber explained that they are necessary to maintaining our humanity.
“Without art we would be machines and all very unhappy.” Chauber said. ” And that’s a scientific fact. Music can inspire people and move people. All of the arts contribute and inspire people to put they’re general arts aside and watch for a moment.”
“The arts are what makes us a civilization,” Oser stated. “They make us human.”